mgr-revengeance-pc-review

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance released last year on home consoles to stellar acclaim from players and even made a few Game of the Year lists [1, 2], but we can’t have what might possibly be Platinum Games‘ finest work to date fade into a distant memory of the unenlightened masses. With Konami venturing further and further onto PC and with Platinum’s first foray into development on the platform, Metal Gear Rising more than proves that PC is a perfect home for both entities to thrive on.

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The PC version of Revengeance is, needless to say, more stellar than the first incarnation of the game. With updated graphics to harness the potential boost in hardware (the lowest resolution available is actually quite comparable to the console versions) and added functionality puts it well above its console predecessor.

For the straight facts, the game runs at a maximum available 1920×1080 resolution without any modding, but is limited in resolutions with 800×600, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1366×768, and 1680×1050 as other available options depending on your computational power. Revengeance on PC will also upscale to your monitor’s native resolution in fullscreen mode and only offers other available resolutions in windowed frames. The game runs at 30fps during cutscenes and menu selections, but 60fps during actual play.

Other settings the PC version includes are a maximum antialiasing up to MSAAx8, texture filtering up to anistropic x16, motion blur toggling, settings for Zangeki (maximum number of pieces an object can be cut into), and Zantime (after being cut, how long the individual objects will remain on-screen before fading away), alongside inherent graphic options from Low to High which adjust the above settings accordingly.

The game seems to have reverse mouse acceleration implemented, which makes the port feel sluggish when playing with keyboard and mouse. Slow mouse movements are not recognized, so slow camera adjustments will not respond whatsoever. During Blade Mode, the mouse controls your now-analog blade attacks, but camera movement is then mapped to the keyboard and the transition is somewhat awkward. This instance is no different than using a controller (with default button configuration), but it doesn’t feel natural. That said, controller strongly recommended, and the game is optimized for an Xbox 360 controller (or third-party equivalent, like Logitech), but can also be played with a DualShock 4, however your prompts will still display as 360 controller prompts.

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Above all, the game comes packed with everything the console versions promised and more. All the preorder DLC is included with your purchase of Metal Gear Rising on PC, including the limited Gray Wolf costume and Fox Blade weapon. If you enter the Konami Code from the get-go, all story-related unlocks become available to you, including the ability to play as Jetstream Sam and Blade Wolf in their respective DLC stories and, most importantly, there’s a boss chapter select mode to enable you to fight Mistral, Monsoon, Sundowner, Metal Gear Excelsus, and Senator Armstrong whenever you like. Sam’s and Blade Wolf’s bosses (Armstrong and Khamsin) are also available as chapter selections.

By far the most questionable thing about this port is that the cutscenes total up something close to 21 GB of the 24 GB game size, which seems a bit ludicrous regarding modern compression techniques, but since it’s Platinum’s first go at the platform, we’ll let ‘em slide this time.

All in all, the PC version of Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is far and above the best available on any platform. Looking even better than the console versions and with the added bonus of taking on Revengeance’s bombastic bosses whenever you please, this PC port is sharp and a cut above the rest.


No score? No problem! We have already reviewed this title. The text above is solely to inform you about changes made in this version versus the others.

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance was developed by Platinum Games and published by Konami. This title is currently available on PC via Steam for $29.99.

A digital download via Steam was provided to Save/Continue by the publisher for review purposes.

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